James Flanders, known musically as James, is an upcoming music producer coming out of Philadelphia. After recently quitting his job to pursue his passion, James is dialed in and ready to establish a name for himself in the future bass and electronic music scene. Riding the wave of his massive single titled ‘One More Night’ and his remix of Zedd’s ‘Clarity’, James has his sights set high as he rolls into 2021.

We sat down with James to discuss his inspirations, career goals, and more.

Check out the full interview below!

How did you get into making music?

I’ve loved music for a long, long time. I always had an interest in making it myself in high school and college but never dove in and learned. It seemed overwhelming, and I never thought it was something I could do. In my last year of college, I finally began messing around with Ableton. As college was winding down, I realized I needed to take finding a job and starting a career seriously. Since music was something I was always passionate about, I figured it was time to explore that avenue.

What drew you to electronic music?

 A few things. The big sell is the passion and energy that come with the music. There’s something about EDM music that really makes me feel. It’s a beautiful thing. Apart from that, though, I love the community. When I started going to these concerts, I was blown away by how friendly everyone was.

What’s your creative process? Do you have a specific routine, or does it vary depending on the day?

 When I’m starting a song, I always begin with the chord progression. The progression sets the mood for the entire song, so it’s a great place to start. From there, it’s kind of random. I build off the progression in no particular order, letting whatever ideas I’m hearing flow naturally. This way, I don’t confine myself to thinking, “I need to do the beat next” or “Now I have to do the melody.” I feel like that would be limiting and damper ideas coming naturally.

You recently took some time off from producing to sharpen your DJ skills. What was the most challenging part of that process?

Honestly, it wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be. I was lucky to have a few friends who knew how to DJ already that walked me through it. That and some YouTube videos. If you want to learn how to DJ, you can learn in a week if you put in an hour a day. The hardest part was having opportunities actually to put the skill to use! Nothing like learning how to DJ for a crowd during a quarantine when there can’t be crowds.

Your first-ever show was a live stream, which is becoming a great tool for new and established DJs alike. Do you believe live streams will be a new normal even when live music comes back?

I don’t think so. While they have been a great substitute for live music during quarantine, it really is just that – a substitute. You will never be able to match the real thing through a tv screen. Something I could see happening is putting live in-person concerts (when they come back) up to stream for people who can’t make the concert. I think that would be pretty cool.

You announced you quit your job to pursue music full time, which I applaud. Do you believe having that do-or-die attitude will push you further than having a plan b to fall back on?

 Thank you! I think it will. I think quitting the job made it real for me. While it was always in the back of my mind I wanted to make this music thing happen, I never really believed it WOULD happen while working. My job was my plan A and my career, so it’s where a lot of my energy went (even though I hated it). To anyone reading this who hates their job – IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THAT WAY. It might take some hard work to make your passions your career, but it is undoubtedly worth it.

I love your clarity remix, and your live set was very euphoric and nostalgic. Who would you say are your biggest inspirations for your sound?

Thank you! That’s what I go for. I try to take inspiration from anyone I’m listening to, but I do take more from a few artists specifically. Illenium, Nurko, and Porter Robinson are a few to note. Like I said earlier, I like EDM music because it really makes me feel. These artists, in particular, drive that home for me. I want to give that amazing feeling I get from those artists to the people listening to my music.

Would you say there are any other genres aside from EDM that have an impact on your creative process?

 For sure! I grew up listening to rap and alternative. I always listened to a decent amount of classic rock as well (thanks, dad!!). I’m lucky to have parents who LOVE music and love a wide range of it too. I have no doubt that the exposure to so much good music over the years has impacted how I produce.

Who are your favorite artists at the moment?

Nurko, Illenium, Elderbrook, and Rüfüs Du Sol.

What was the best concert or festival you’ve been to and why?

 This is a tough one! I’ve been to so many amazing shows and festivals, which I feel very lucky for. If we’re talking specific concert, I’d say Flume at Firefly 2017. Flume’s music is so damn cool and different. Seeing that live was like no concert I’d been to before. So unique. Festival wise I’d say Ultra 2019. The lineup was an absolute beauty, and the setting was just magical in general. I also went with an amazing group of people.

If you could work with any artist from any genre, who would it be?

 I’m sounding like a broken record here but probably Illenium. He’s one of my bigger influences and also unbelievably talented. I could learn so much from him.

If you could accomplish one goal in your musical career, what would it be?

 When my adventure into making music is all said and done, whenever that may be, I just hope that it brought some positivity, love, and connection into this world. That’s what music is all about. If my music is able to do that, I’d be the happiest guy in the world.

Daniel Butler, a music producer from Memphis Tennessee, who goes by the name Kane has taken full advantage of the halt in the music scene. As tours, festivals, and live music have come to a complete stop, due to the corona virus, Kane has been hard at work in the studio and traveling the world at the same time. With just under two years of music production under his belt he is already establishing a name for himself.

Kane has just released his new single “Cutting you Loose’ featuring singer/songwriter Rachel Leycroft which follows his first single “Where Did You Go” released in July of 2020.

Inspired by artists such as Illenium, Odesza, and RL Grime, Kane is on pace to becoming the next big thing in Future Bass and melodic dubstep.

We caught up with Kane to talk about his travels, music festivals, and more.

Check out the full interview below!

How did you get into music? Has it been something that has always been a big part of your life?

I came from a musical family, so music was always a part of my life. My dad played guitar and sang and my mom was in band and choir in school. I joined band in middle school, ended up going to college for music education, and now I make music full time. It’s easily been a huge part of my life.

What’s your creative process? Do you have a specific routine or is every day different?

It’s always a little different, but I’ve found a routine that allows me to be most creative because I don’t have to think about the minutiae of production. I have a template that I start every project that has everything loaded up so that I don’t have to start from scratch every time. I then usually start with a chord progression because I believe it’s really what makes a song special. After I create a simple drum pattern and make a melody that becomes the main idea of the song. From there, it’s arranging, instrumentation, and finding a vocalist. It’s a fairly simple routine, but it allows me to be the most creative I can be.

You’ve been traveling for some time now. Do you find it harder to focus on music when you’re constantly on the move as opposed to having a permanent studio at home?

Quite the opposite! We stay put anywhere from 1-3 months which is plenty of time for me to dig in and not be distracted like I would be at home. I don’t make music on the days that we are traveling but it doesn’t really set me back at all.

What has been your favorite city/ country you’ve visited on your travels?

Lisbon, Portugal for sure. The vibe there was really vibrant. Everyone seemed to be happy, they were always polite, and the weather is nice there pretty much year round. Edinburgh, Scotland is a close second. 

How do you find inspiration when writing music?

Honestly, a cool chord progression is all I need to get going. I like to take standard chord progressions and make little changes to their structure to make something that sounds both familiar and unique. I also get a lot of inspiration from my favorite artists but also all of the great undiscovered talent that I see on social media all the time. 

Who would you say your non-EDM influences are? 

I actually didn’t even listen to EDM until about 2 years ago, so I have a bunch! Linkin Park was my first favorite band, and I feel like I still draw from their energy sometimes. I also love Kendrick Lamar, Daniel Caesar, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Coldplay,  Snarky Puppy, and a ton more. When I say I listen to a bit of everything, I mean it. 

If I were to look at your music library at the moment what would I find?

I have a few different EDM playlists depending on my mood but I also have a running playlist that has a bunch of music from different genres! You’ll find everything from hip hop to film scores on there.

What was the best concert or festival you’ve been to and why?

1000% Odesza’s “A Moment Apart” at Bonnaroo. The performance is literally why I decided to make music. Not only was the music extremely good, but the production value and their attention to detail really made it special. I still get chills going back and watching videos from that tour. 

If you could work with any artist alive or dead who would it be?

There is a TON but if I had to choose it would be Illenium. Not only is he my biggest inspiration for my sound, but he just seems like a chill dude that I think I’d vibe with. 

If you could play any festival or venue what would it be and why?

Bonnaroo. It’s where it all started for me. It may not be as big as EDC Las Vegas, but it’s always going to have a special place in my heart.

You’ve just released your second single “Cutting you Loose” after only producing for less than two years which is pretty remarkable. Any tips for new producers?

Produce. Every. Day. It doesn’t matter how busy you are. Make time EVERY day even if for a few minutes to produce. It’s a tough discipline and can only be done if you put the work in.

Lastly, if you had one message to give to your fans what would it be? 

You guys are amazing and have been mega supportive since day one. I can’t wait to play for you live one day!