If there is one thing that quarantine has shown us about the music industry, it’s that the electronic dance scene as a collective cannot be stopped. You can take away our shows, festivals, and tours, but our music isn’t going anywhere. With the “if you build it, they will come” attitude, EDM has stepped up to the plate better than any other genre in all of music.  From live stream events to drive in raves to quarantine mixes, the EDM community has proven day in and day out that our community goes far beyond live music. If you are apart of the community, you understand. It doesn’t matter if you love dubstep, house, big room,  trance, or any other sub-genre, the unity, passion, and love for this music is undeniable. Festivals, artists, and labels have created a virtual world of music, bringing everything we love about the scene right into our living rooms. Whether you’ve thrown a house party to watch one of the numerous rave- athons hosted by Pasquale and Insomniac, sat on zoom with your friends while getting down to Lsdream, or raved by yourself to Ghastly in your room, live streams have made the most challenging year of our lives a little more enjoyable. Of course, nothing can replace that transcendent feeling live music offers. Still, I’m thankful for EDM for keeping the rave alive and proud to be apart of this beautiful community during these presented and trying times.

Here are our favorite sets that got us through quarantine!

10. Sidepiece- Edc Vegas Rave-a-Thon

Powerhouse DJ’s Nitti Gritti and Party Favor team up for a bumpin’ b2b under their house moniker Sidepiece!

9. Slander Virtual Vibes (Medusa Set)

Slander throws down a legendary set with one of the coolest stage set up we’ve seen resembling the head of Medusa.

8. Ducky – HARD Summer Staycation Virtual Rave-A-Thon

Ducky shocks Insomniac’s founder Pasquale and viewers alike with one of the best sets we’ve seen all of quarantine.

7. Dr. Fresch – Original Sound 

Dr. Fresch throws down as usual in front of a crowd of 90,000 marijuana plants!

6.CloZee – ShambhaRoo

Clozee perfectly synchronizes her Shambhala and Bonnaroo set into a tripped out show in the jungle!

5. Jai Wolf – Secret Sky

Jai wolf puts a unique spin on a live stream set as he incorporates stellar graphics in an exclusive audiovisual mix.

4. Subtronics- Bonnaroo 2020

Subtronics debuts new music in an all original set for Bonnaroo’s Virtual Festival!

3. Porter Robinson -Secret Sky

Porter Robinson closes out a virtual version of his Sky Festival with a nostalgic hour and a half set.

2. Lane 8 – Sunrise Set 

Lane 8 plays a euphoric set as he cruises Grand lake in Colorado.

1. Lsdream- Rave Cave Series

It’s hard to pick just one rave cave set as Lsdream throws down different themed sets displaying new music, trippy graphics, and heavy wubs!

Ultra Miami is set to be canceled yet again for concerns created by the coronavirus. Organizers of the festival are awaiting approval of the new dates from the city of Miami before releasing an official cancelation announcement.

This will be the second straight year Ultra has been forced to cancel due to the pandemic. Last year Ultra was canceled just a week before its opening day as it became the first major festival to close its doors due to the virus.

In a letter dated on January 21, 2021, Ultra’s general counsel attorney, Sandy York states that conditions that led city officials to cancel Ultra in 2020 remain in place for 2021. York also asks for approval to reschedule the festival.

As Ultra is always held in March, news of the cancellation in 2021 comes to no surprise as covid19 rates continue to climb throughout America. With the vaccine just now starting to circulate, there is not enough time for spring shows to safely occur, let alone major festivals.

Organizers hope to hold the festival in 2022 from March 25-27 at Bayfront Amphitheater.

Ultra is one of the world’s biggest electronic music festivals and showcases some of the best talent that dance music has to offer.

James Flanders, known musically as James, is an upcoming music producer coming out of Philadelphia. After recently quitting his job to pursue his passion, James is dialed in and ready to establish a name for himself in the future bass and electronic music scene. Riding the wave of his massive single titled ‘One More Night’ and his remix of Zedd’s ‘Clarity’, James has his sights set high as he rolls into 2021.

We sat down with James to discuss his inspirations, career goals, and more.

Check out the full interview below!

How did you get into making music?

I’ve loved music for a long, long time. I always had an interest in making it myself in high school and college but never dove in and learned. It seemed overwhelming, and I never thought it was something I could do. In my last year of college, I finally began messing around with Ableton. As college was winding down, I realized I needed to take finding a job and starting a career seriously. Since music was something I was always passionate about, I figured it was time to explore that avenue.

What drew you to electronic music?

 A few things. The big sell is the passion and energy that come with the music. There’s something about EDM music that really makes me feel. It’s a beautiful thing. Apart from that, though, I love the community. When I started going to these concerts, I was blown away by how friendly everyone was.

What’s your creative process? Do you have a specific routine, or does it vary depending on the day?

 When I’m starting a song, I always begin with the chord progression. The progression sets the mood for the entire song, so it’s a great place to start. From there, it’s kind of random. I build off the progression in no particular order, letting whatever ideas I’m hearing flow naturally. This way, I don’t confine myself to thinking, “I need to do the beat next” or “Now I have to do the melody.” I feel like that would be limiting and damper ideas coming naturally.

You recently took some time off from producing to sharpen your DJ skills. What was the most challenging part of that process?

Honestly, it wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be. I was lucky to have a few friends who knew how to DJ already that walked me through it. That and some YouTube videos. If you want to learn how to DJ, you can learn in a week if you put in an hour a day. The hardest part was having opportunities actually to put the skill to use! Nothing like learning how to DJ for a crowd during a quarantine when there can’t be crowds.

Your first-ever show was a live stream, which is becoming a great tool for new and established DJs alike. Do you believe live streams will be a new normal even when live music comes back?

I don’t think so. While they have been a great substitute for live music during quarantine, it really is just that – a substitute. You will never be able to match the real thing through a tv screen. Something I could see happening is putting live in-person concerts (when they come back) up to stream for people who can’t make the concert. I think that would be pretty cool.

You announced you quit your job to pursue music full time, which I applaud. Do you believe having that do-or-die attitude will push you further than having a plan b to fall back on?

 Thank you! I think it will. I think quitting the job made it real for me. While it was always in the back of my mind I wanted to make this music thing happen, I never really believed it WOULD happen while working. My job was my plan A and my career, so it’s where a lot of my energy went (even though I hated it). To anyone reading this who hates their job – IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THAT WAY. It might take some hard work to make your passions your career, but it is undoubtedly worth it.

I love your clarity remix, and your live set was very euphoric and nostalgic. Who would you say are your biggest inspirations for your sound?

Thank you! That’s what I go for. I try to take inspiration from anyone I’m listening to, but I do take more from a few artists specifically. Illenium, Nurko, and Porter Robinson are a few to note. Like I said earlier, I like EDM music because it really makes me feel. These artists, in particular, drive that home for me. I want to give that amazing feeling I get from those artists to the people listening to my music.

Would you say there are any other genres aside from EDM that have an impact on your creative process?

 For sure! I grew up listening to rap and alternative. I always listened to a decent amount of classic rock as well (thanks, dad!!). I’m lucky to have parents who LOVE music and love a wide range of it too. I have no doubt that the exposure to so much good music over the years has impacted how I produce.

Who are your favorite artists at the moment?

Nurko, Illenium, Elderbrook, and Rüfüs Du Sol.

What was the best concert or festival you’ve been to and why?

 This is a tough one! I’ve been to so many amazing shows and festivals, which I feel very lucky for. If we’re talking specific concert, I’d say Flume at Firefly 2017. Flume’s music is so damn cool and different. Seeing that live was like no concert I’d been to before. So unique. Festival wise I’d say Ultra 2019. The lineup was an absolute beauty, and the setting was just magical in general. I also went with an amazing group of people.

If you could work with any artist from any genre, who would it be?

 I’m sounding like a broken record here but probably Illenium. He’s one of my bigger influences and also unbelievably talented. I could learn so much from him.

If you could accomplish one goal in your musical career, what would it be?

 When my adventure into making music is all said and done, whenever that may be, I just hope that it brought some positivity, love, and connection into this world. That’s what music is all about. If my music is able to do that, I’d be the happiest guy in the world.

As coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, the music festival industry is stuck in limbo as uncertainty takes a firm grip on the fate of live music.

Uncertainty was pushed even further this morning as Glastonbury, the world’s biggest music festival, held in England, announced its cancelation for 2021 and has decided to set its sights on the 2022 festival season. If a festival this large has already been canceled, the odds of a festival season happening this summer are slim.

Official Glastonbury Announcement

Yet, strangely enough, this afternoon, The Rothbury Village Council approved dates in June 2021 for Electric forest as well as two alternate weekends in August. This by no means guarantees that the festival will happen but offers a slight sense of optimism towards the possibility of Electric Forrest making a comeback in 2021.

Regardless of today’s events, the fate of live music and festivals are still very much in limbo for the upcoming season, but music fans can remain hopeful.

Continue to tune in to The Daily Frequency for music festival updates.

It is no secret that female DJs don’t get the recognition they deserve in the music industry. You wouldn’t know it from looking at many festival lineups, but there is a sea of talented female DJs and producers who not only have a massive following but are a driving force behind electronic dance music.  

For National DJ Day, it is only fitting we celebrate our favorite female DJs!

10. Lucii

After breaking into the scene with a massive EP titled Abduction, Lucii has been taken the bass scene by storm. Since then, she has been hard at work releasing music with Champagne Drip and a second ep called Wicked in 2020. Known for her celestial vocals and captivating production skills, this alien will wreak havoc once festival season returns.

9. GG Magree

Known for her versatile high-energy sets, GG Magree sure knows how to throw the fuck down. Mixing everything from hip-hop, to dubstep, to hardstyle GG knows how to get the party bumpin!

8. Clozee

Known for her dreamy psychedelic productions, Clozee is one of the most unique sounds in all of bass music. Drawing inspiration from her world travels and classical instruments, the French producer has established an identity as a pioneer in her genre-bending bass.

7. Mija

Mija’s career exploded after going b2b with Skrillex for a legendary sunrise set on the Kalliope Stage at Bonnaroo in 2014. Known for her genre-bending sounds with roots embedded in house, Mija has a style all her own as she continues to push the boundaries of dance music.

6. Whipped Cream

Coming fresh off her first full-length Lp titled Who Is Whipped Cream, Whipped Cream combines hip-hop, heavy metal, and hard-hitting dubstep to create a heart-thumping, goosebump rising experience.

5. Ducky

Another versatile DJ who can sing, play instruments, and produce, Ducky, mixes melodic pop with hard-hitting dubstep, hardcore, and hardstyle. Known for her massive performances at festivals such as Bonnaroo and EDC Las Vegas Ducky is quickly rising to dance music stardom.

4. Tokimonsta

With one of the most inspiring stories in the industry, Tokimonsta was left unable to read music and communicate following two brain surgeries after being diagnosed with Moyamoya disease in 2015. Instead of giving up, she pushed forward and has become one of the defining sounds in modern dance and beat music. Just one year after her final surgery, she received a Grammy nomination for best dance/electronic album for her 2017 release called Lune Rouge. When live music resumes, expect to see Tokimonsta grace many major festival lineups.

3. Level Up

After studying turntablism under the legendary Rob Swift, this hip-hop battle DJ turned Dubstep enthusiast is set to take over 2021.  With her musical storytelling ability mixed with a knack for heavy-hitting wubs, Level Up is a force to be reckoned with.

2. Rezz

Rezz, also known as the self-proclaimed Space Mom, has been rocking festival crowds for a few years now and is nowhere near slowing down. With an undeniable unique sound, the Canadian producer has been at the forefront of dance music as she combines heavy bass, minimal tech, and dark techno.

1. Alison Wonderland

One of the biggest stars in dance music, Alison can do it all. Not only does she sing, produce, and DJ, but she plays live instruments such as the cello during her sets. Leaving everything she as on the stage, Alison has been lighting the electronic scene on fire. Expect her to be headlining major festivals and sold out tours once live music returns.

Last week British Producer and dubstep pioneer Flux Pavilion announced that he is “no longer a dubstep person” via Twitter, turning his fan base into a frenzy as they questioned what was next for the Bass Cannon DJ.

After ten years of pushing the genre forward with massive bass-heavy hits, Flux no longer feels inspiration or joy when it comes to creating dubstep bangers. However, that does not mean he is quitting music altogether. Instead, he is reinventing himself and announced a new album to be released on Thursday, January 21.

The album titled .Wav is utterly different than anything Flux has previously released yet still stays true to his electronic roots. Based on the album’s singles, Flux seems to be transitioning into a more relaxed style with chill melodies, graceful chord progressions, and angelic harmonies.

It is always refreshing to see an artist on Flux’s level find the motivation to reinvent and challenge themselves creatively. It’s going to be a surreal feeling to hear what Flux has in store for us on Thursday.

.Wav will be available on all streaming platforms.

Flux also announced a live stream event to celebrate the album on February 5th and 6th.

No era has been more transformative in music culture than the 1960s. Thanks to a combination of psychedelic drugs, the anti-war movement, and a longing for peace and unity, creativity exploded in a rebellious yet enticing fashion throughout the globe. The music changed, clothing styles were reimagined, hair became long, and the hippie was born. On the forefront of the rapidly changing culture were bands and artists such as the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, and Janis Joplin who challenged the status quo, and birthed a spiritual revolution.

Now 60 years later a new spiritual revolution has begun and once again music is at the forefront of this modern-day hippie resurgence. Here are 10 of our favorite artists and bands that fully embrace the infamous 60’s counter culture.

10. Flatbush Zombies

The Flatbush Zombies also known as the Glorious Dead is where hip-hop meets the hippie. Known for their outrages outfits, outspoken views on psychedelics, and controversial yet spiritual lyrical content, the Flatbush Zombies have reinvented hippie culture while pushing the boundaries of hip-hop.

9. Subtronics

Known for his heavy bass and wonky wubs, Subtonics is quickly becoming dubstep’s loudest stoner. With his “hair down to his knees” as John Lennon may say, and love for all things marijuana, Subtonics would fit right in on the corner of Haight-Asbury during the 1960s.

8. Glass Animals

When it comes to psychedelic pop, there aren’t too many bands that can keep up with the Glass Animals. Inspired by bands like The Beatles, and the Beach Boys, The Glass Animals set themselves apart with weird unique soundscapes that will take you on a trip.

7. Alison Wonderland

With her name an ode to the psychedelic “children’s movie” Alison Wonderland has become one of the biggest superstars in dance music and is the definition of a free spirit. Living for the music, traveling the world and constantly preaching, love and peace at her shows,  Alison fully embodies the rockstar lifestyle of the 1960s.

6. Run the Jewels

Another out of the box hip-hop group, Run the Jewels does not only rap about psychedelics, peace, and love, but are on the forefront of the civil rights movement. Killer Mike has been in the trenches fighting for peace and justice for his communities while encouraging younger generations to vote and make a change.

5. Lsdream

If there was one DJ leading the spiritual awakening in electronic music, it would without a doubt be Lsdream. From his trippy albums, to his Beatles remixes, to his guided meditation sessions, Lsdream represents everything that’s good about hippie culture. If you were to send  Lsdream back in time to Woodstock 69 to play a set heads would explode.  

4. Beach House

All it takes is one listen to any of Beach House’s albums to be blasted into psychedelic euphoria. Their hypnotic tones and dreamy energy transmitted through their sound and persona will have you questioning if they were sent here from the hippie generation. “We are very, very big believers in the power of love and empathy. This is going to sound hippy-dippy but… we really, really care about love and empathy” the band explained in an interview with Stereo Gum in 2018.

3. Odesza

A fan favorite at festivals throughout the world, Odesza is one of the most magical acts in electronic dance music. Showcasing a live show with a full band Odesza is all about creating a truly unforgettable experience. 50 years from now kids will listen to A moment Apart claiming they were born in the wrong generation.

2. Griz

Griz is one of the most diverse acts in electronic music with the ability to go funky, hard, psychedelic, groovy, and euphoric all at once. From his Chasing the Golden Hour mixes, to his saxophone solos, and heavy bass drops Griz’s repertoire is loud and abundant. Music aside, he is also deeply involved in spreading consciousness and love. Griz is outspoken about the benefits of psychedelics such as LSD and marijuana. He constantly gives back to the world whether he’s protesting with Black Lives Matter, raising money for his charity with events such as Grizmas, or promoting self-empowerment with his meditation retreats at Camp Kulubunga.

1. Tame Impala

Known as the Pink Floyd of our generation, Kevin Parker and Tame Impala are the closest thing we’ve got to the psychedelic rock scene of the 1960s. Everything about Tame Impala screams hippie, from their tripped-out music to their live shows, to the fans they attract. Inspired by mind-altering substances and bands like the doors, Tame Impala will take you on a trip through time itself.

Daniel Butler, a music producer from Memphis Tennessee, who goes by the name Kane has taken full advantage of the halt in the music scene. As tours, festivals, and live music have come to a complete stop, due to the corona virus, Kane has been hard at work in the studio and traveling the world at the same time. With just under two years of music production under his belt he is already establishing a name for himself.

Kane has just released his new single “Cutting you Loose’ featuring singer/songwriter Rachel Leycroft which follows his first single “Where Did You Go” released in July of 2020.

Inspired by artists such as Illenium, Odesza, and RL Grime, Kane is on pace to becoming the next big thing in Future Bass and melodic dubstep.

We caught up with Kane to talk about his travels, music festivals, and more.

Check out the full interview below!

How did you get into music? Has it been something that has always been a big part of your life?

I came from a musical family, so music was always a part of my life. My dad played guitar and sang and my mom was in band and choir in school. I joined band in middle school, ended up going to college for music education, and now I make music full time. It’s easily been a huge part of my life.

What’s your creative process? Do you have a specific routine or is every day different?

It’s always a little different, but I’ve found a routine that allows me to be most creative because I don’t have to think about the minutiae of production. I have a template that I start every project that has everything loaded up so that I don’t have to start from scratch every time. I then usually start with a chord progression because I believe it’s really what makes a song special. After I create a simple drum pattern and make a melody that becomes the main idea of the song. From there, it’s arranging, instrumentation, and finding a vocalist. It’s a fairly simple routine, but it allows me to be the most creative I can be.

You’ve been traveling for some time now. Do you find it harder to focus on music when you’re constantly on the move as opposed to having a permanent studio at home?

Quite the opposite! We stay put anywhere from 1-3 months which is plenty of time for me to dig in and not be distracted like I would be at home. I don’t make music on the days that we are traveling but it doesn’t really set me back at all.

What has been your favorite city/ country you’ve visited on your travels?

Lisbon, Portugal for sure. The vibe there was really vibrant. Everyone seemed to be happy, they were always polite, and the weather is nice there pretty much year round. Edinburgh, Scotland is a close second. 

How do you find inspiration when writing music?

Honestly, a cool chord progression is all I need to get going. I like to take standard chord progressions and make little changes to their structure to make something that sounds both familiar and unique. I also get a lot of inspiration from my favorite artists but also all of the great undiscovered talent that I see on social media all the time. 

Who would you say your non-EDM influences are? 

I actually didn’t even listen to EDM until about 2 years ago, so I have a bunch! Linkin Park was my first favorite band, and I feel like I still draw from their energy sometimes. I also love Kendrick Lamar, Daniel Caesar, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Coldplay,  Snarky Puppy, and a ton more. When I say I listen to a bit of everything, I mean it. 

If I were to look at your music library at the moment what would I find?

I have a few different EDM playlists depending on my mood but I also have a running playlist that has a bunch of music from different genres! You’ll find everything from hip hop to film scores on there.

What was the best concert or festival you’ve been to and why?

1000% Odesza’s “A Moment Apart” at Bonnaroo. The performance is literally why I decided to make music. Not only was the music extremely good, but the production value and their attention to detail really made it special. I still get chills going back and watching videos from that tour. 

If you could work with any artist alive or dead who would it be?

There is a TON but if I had to choose it would be Illenium. Not only is he my biggest inspiration for my sound, but he just seems like a chill dude that I think I’d vibe with. 

If you could play any festival or venue what would it be and why?

Bonnaroo. It’s where it all started for me. It may not be as big as EDC Las Vegas, but it’s always going to have a special place in my heart.

You’ve just released your second single “Cutting you Loose” after only producing for less than two years which is pretty remarkable. Any tips for new producers?

Produce. Every. Day. It doesn’t matter how busy you are. Make time EVERY day even if for a few minutes to produce. It’s a tough discipline and can only be done if you put the work in.

Lastly, if you had one message to give to your fans what would it be? 

You guys are amazing and have been mega supportive since day one. I can’t wait to play for you live one day! 

The Universe has a peculiar way of speaking to you, especially when your judgments are closed and your heart and mind are open. When you are tuned into the right frequency, it becomes obvious that there is another force guiding us through this existence. You just have to trust that energy, and once you do, you recognize that the answers are often right in front of you and have been this whole time. Everything that happens in life has a purpose. It may not be what you want, expect, or understand, but as time goes on, you will realize that it was exactly what you needed.
It was the beginning of October, and my friends and I finally copped tickets to a drive-in rave. Not just any show but the Wakaan Halloween takeover in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Liquid Stranger, Champagne Drip, and Mize were set to throw down on top of Montage Mountain. We couldn’t think of a better first show back since the pandemic and were hyped as fuck, to say the least. Not just for the fact that we were going to see Liquid Stranger, or that we were finally going to see live music, but that we could ultimately rage together. We haven’t danced and headbanged through the night since Okeechobee, and we were all itching for an evening of good vibes, good music, and debauchery.
As Halloween approached, Liquid Stranger announced that each night of the three-day takeover would be unique. Night one would be dedicated to throwback jams, night two would be a tripped set, and night three would be full of bangers. Each night was sold out, and we were going to night two.
As much as I love downtempo tripped out music, I was skeptical of the tripped-out theme. It was my first show in 8 months, and I wanted to party. I had all this pent up energy from quarantine that I needed to release. How can I do that during a slow trippy show? But the Universe doesn’t always give you what you want but what you need.
Aside from my reserves, we were ready to be back in our element. We missed the crowd, the atmosphere, and of course, the people. Before we knew it, it was Friday morning, and we were finally on our 2 hour Journey to Montage Mountain Resorts to check in our hotel before the show. The only problem was it was not only freezing but raining. Not the greatest weather for an outdoor show, but the gray clouds wouldn’t stop our shine. After sitting in line for almost two hours, with flashbacks to Bonnaroo 2019, we finally made it in just in time for Mize to hit the stage.
Strangely enough, the sky opened up, and all the clouds disappeared. A full moon lit up the heavens above with Mars in the background. It was still cold, but it was perfect. As the night went on, Mize changed to DMVU, which switched to Champagne Drip, and then finally Liquid Stranger. The entire time I could not take my eyes off the moon. All I kept thinking that this is what humans have been doing for thousands of years. Dancing under the full moon, losing ourselves in the moment.

As Liquid Stranger finished his set, he spoke about his decision to perform a tripped set under the full moon. That he never gets a chance to play the music that he played that night. That every song he played from Stairway to Heaven by Led Zeppelin to Forever Young by Rod Stewart had an impact on his life and his career. He spoke on how the world was going through a transition and that we need to treat each other with love.
It is then I realized that the Universe was speaking to me through Liquid Stranger. The world is going through a transition, but so am I. I realized that the tripped set was exactly what I needed. Instead of giving me a night full of bangers for my first show back, I got music that opens your mind and soothes the soul. I’ve been going to shows for ten years now, and I’ve partied as hard as anyone. I kept having this thought that part of my life is over. Not that I’ll stop going to shows or festivals, but my intentions will change. That I will be motivated by spirituality instead of just getting fucked up. It was as if the Universe was pushing me in a new direction.

Since then, I’ve been meditating, reading, and positively focusing on my goals, and things are suddenly falling into place. I’m starting to get opportunities I’ve never had before, I feel better mentally and physically, and I have a newfound excitement for the future.
I felt this story was important to share as we head into 2020’s winter solstice coming early next week. On December 21, for the first time in 800 years, Saturn and Jupiter will align, creating what’s called the great conjunction allowing the Christmas star to be visible. This extraordinary event is said to be a sign of powerful change and spiritual transformation as we transition to a new age.
The fact that this will happen in 2020 is pretty remarkable considering what’s going on in the world. 2020 isn’t the year we asked for, but it is the year we needed. A year that acted as a wake-up call to say that this way of existence, full of hate, neglect for the earth, carelessness for our health, and need for material pleasures, is not sustainable. Our way of life has been taken from us. We have been forced to stay inside with no restaurants, no bars, no concerts, festivals, weddings, or parties. We can’t go to work, kids can’t go to school, and some of us have lost loved ones. But through all the tragedy, there is a silver lining. 2020 has forced us to find happiness from within and think in different ways. It taught us not to take life for granted because you never know when life will abruptly change. People are finally beginning to wake up. Everyone has grown in someway through quarantine. Whether it’s finding a new hobby, a new passion, or realizing you can survive on much less than you thought.
We’ve seen worldwide protests in the name of peace and equality. Governments are being exposed, the powers are shifting, and the world is learning that love trumps all. As Bob Dylan famously put it, “The times are a changin!” 2020 was not the year we wanted, but the year we needed. We struggled and survived together. New beginnings are ahead of us. It’s time to stop saying fuck 2020 and start being grateful that it happened. 2020 will be known as the year we woke up, and 2021 will not only be our year but a promising start to our greater purpose.

According to Joe Berchtold, Live Nation is feeling extremely confident and optimistic about the state of live music. With reports of vaccine development, already underway Berchtold predicts live music will be back in full swing come 2021.

“We feel good right now. At this point, given the vaccine news, we start to see with much greater clarity what the path return to live is” Berchtold told CNBC on an interview earlier this week.

As the corona virus begins to spike once again in America, we see what a post covid music scene looks like as Asia and parts of Australia and New Zealand have already brought live music and festivals back to full capacity.

A sea of 10,000 fans at Ultra Taiwan. November 14, 2020

With a vaccine in place and readily available, the possibility of live music returning becomes greater and greater. With Live Nation festivals such as Bonnaroo already scheduled for the September, the return to normal seems to be right around the corner.

It is essential at this time to continue wearing masks and practice social distancing, and before we know it, we will be back in that crowd dancing and singing with our friends. We’ve made it eight months. We can make it a few more!