Daniel Butler, a music producer from Memphis Tennessee, who goes by the name Kane has taken full advantage of the halt in the music scene. As tours, festivals, and live music have come to a complete stop, due to the corona virus, Kane has been hard at work in the studio and traveling the world at the same time. With just under two years of music production under his belt he is already establishing a name for himself.

Kane has just released his new single “Cutting you Loose’ featuring singer/songwriter Rachel Leycroft which follows his first single “Where Did You Go” released in July of 2020.

Inspired by artists such as Illenium, Odesza, and RL Grime, Kane is on pace to becoming the next big thing in Future Bass and melodic dubstep.

We caught up with Kane to talk about his travels, music festivals, and more.

Check out the full interview below!

How did you get into music? Has it been something that has always been a big part of your life?
I came from a musical family, so music was always a part of my life. My dad played guitar and sang and my mom was in band and choir in school. I joined band in middle school, ended up going to college for music education, and now I make music full time. It’s easily been a huge part of my life.

What’s your creative process? Do you have a specific routine or is everyday different?
It’s always a little different, but I’ve found a routine that allows me to be most creative because I don’t have to think about the minutiae of production. I have a template that I start every project that has everything loaded up so that I don’t have to start from scratch every time. I then usually start with a chord progression because I believe it’s really what makes a song special. After I create a simple drum pattern and make a melody that becomes the main idea of the song. From there, it’s arranging, instrumentation, and finding a vocalist. It’s a fairly simple routine, but it allows me to be the most creative I can be.

You’ve been traveling for some time now. Do you find it harder to focus on music when your constantly on the move opposed to having a permanent studio at home?
Quite the opposite! We stay put anywhere from 1-3 months which is plenty of time for me to dig in and not be distracted like I would be at home. I don’t make music on the days that we are traveling but it doesn’t really set me back at all.

What has been your favorite city/ country you’ve visited on your travels?
Lisbon, Portugal for sure. The vibe there was really vibrant. Everyone seemed to be happy, they were always polite, and the weather is nice there pretty much year round. Edinburgh, Scotland is a close second. 

How do you find inspiration when writing music?
Honestly, a cool chord progression is all I need to get going. I like to take standard chord progressions and make little changes to their structure to make something that sounds both familiar and unique. I also get a lot of inspiration from my favorite artists but also all of the great undiscovered talent that I see on social media all the time. 

Who would you say your non EDM influences are? 
I actually didn’t even listen to EDM until about 2 years ago, so I have a bunch! Linkin Park was my first favorite band, and I feel like I still draw from their energy sometimes. I also love Kendrick Lamar, Daniel Caesar, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Coldplay,  Snarky Puppy, and a ton more. When I say I listen to a bit of everything, I mean it. 

If I were to look at your music library at the moment what would I find?
I have a few different EDM playlists depending on my mood but I also have a running playlist that has a bunch of music from different genres! You’ll find everything from hip hop to film scores on there.

What was the best concert or festival you’ve been to and why?
1000% Odesza’s “A Moment Apart” at Bonnaroo. The performance is literally why I decided to make music. Not only was the music extremely good, but the production value and their attention to detail really made it special. I still get chills going back and watching videos from that tour. 

If you could work with any artist alive or dead who would it be?
There is a TON but if I had to choose it would be Illenium. Not only is he my biggest inspiration for my sound, but he just seems like a chill dude that I think I’d vibe with. 

If you could play any festival or venue what would it be and why?
Bonnaroo. It’s where it all started for me. It may not be as big as EDC Las Vegas, but it’s always going to have a special place in my heart.

You’ve just released your second single “Cutting you Loose” after only producing for less than two years which is pretty remarkable. Any tips for new producers? Produce. Every. Day. It doesn’t matter how busy you are. Make time EVERY day even if for a few minutes to produce. It’s a tough discipline and can only be done if you put the work in.

Lastly, if you had one message to give to your fans what would it be? 
You guys are amazing and have been mega supportive since day one. I can’t wait to play for you live one day! 

According to Joe Berchtold, Live Nation is feeling extremely confident and optimistic about the state of live music. With reports of vaccine development, already underway Berchtold predicts live music will be back in full swing come 2021.

“We feel good right now. At this point, given the vaccine news, we start to see with much greater clarity what the path return to live is” Berchtold told CNBC on an interview earlier this week.

As the corona virus begins to spike once again in America, we see what a post covid music scene looks like as Asia and parts of Australia and New Zealand have already brought live music and festivals back to full capacity.

A sea of 10,000 fans at Ultra Taiwan. November 14, 2020

With a vaccine in place and readily available, the possibility of live music returning becomes greater and greater. With Live Nation festivals such as Bonnaroo already scheduled for the September, the return to normal seems to be right around the corner.

It is essential at this time to continue wearing masks and practice social distancing, and before we know it, we will be back in that crowd dancing and singing with our friends. We’ve made it eight months. We can make it a few more!

Dear Bonnaroo,
As June has come and gone, I sit in my apartment with my body not sore from dancing for four days straight, my mind not foggy from a 17-hour drive home, no Amish Donuts in my stomach, but yet I still feel a buzz that only Bonnaroo can produce. If you’ve been there, you understand.

If you have yet to experience the Farm, words cannot do it any justice. It’s not quite the same as returning from our beloved home, but I still feel something. Maybe it’s my body subconsciously thinking it was at Roo as it does every year at this time. Or perhaps it’s the memories from old photos and videos popping up from not only my phone but on my timeline from my friends. There is something special about Bonnaroo. Even when it doesn’t happen, the magic still somehow finds it’s way to us. Scrolling through my feed, watching videos and pictures of past Roos, and watching Homearoo streamed by Bonnaroo365, for now, the third weekend brought me through a roller coaster of emotions. From sadness to happiness, to nostalgia, euphoria, and back to sadness again.

The bonnablues are absolutely a real thing. But it also proved that Bonnaroo is more than just a gathering of hippies listening to music in a field every June. It’s a community like no other that lasts throughout the entire year. I frankly can’t think of any other festival that impacts people’s lives as much as Bonnaroo.

So many great things have happened in my life because I attended my first Roo back in 2017. Not only have I discovered new top-notch music year after year, but I’ve found a new home, made new lifetime friendships, and found love, as the Farm introduced me to my girlfriend of now almost three years. Bonnaroo will always have a special place in my heart.

Before the announcement of the cancellation, I was optimistic about experiencing Septemberoo. You may call it blind ignorance, but due to our world’s current state, I couldn’t think of anything more fitting to end this bizarre time. A place for four days with nothing but love, music, freedom, and togetherness, which we all need so desperately. A break and a release of everything we are going through. Of course, safety is the main priority, and all though it’s heartbreaking, we won’t be on the Farm this year, I understand and have come to peace with it.

2021 is far away, but imagine that feeling of walking through gates next year after everything the world has thrown at us. After not being on the Farm for two whole years. After fighting through the worst times of our lives, through the pandemic, the lockdown, racial injustice, unemployment, the list goes on, and we still have the peace of mind to smile through all the bullshit and come together through love and music.

Yes, the wait sucks, but Bonnaroo is always worth the wait, whether it’s 12 hours in line or two years in between. Next year will, without a doubt, be the best year yet. So thankyou Bonnaroo for giving us a light at the end of the tunnel. This year we will live through the memories we’ve made on the Farm, and I know we will be together soon.

Sincerely,

Tyrone Basket, a Bonnaroovian